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Domain – Setting – Role.

Where you interpret, who you interpret for and how you interpret are considerations interpreters need to think about and prepare for.

“By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” 
― Benjamin Franklin

The interpreter code of conduct; ethical principle 6 outlines what it means to ‘strive to be good’.

Within this principle the interpreter must treat information afforded them as confidential.

Interpreters must never abuse their position and are obliged to declare any conflicts of interest.

Preparation considerations; domain, setting and ethics

Interpreters work in various domains in any number of settings which can raise questions with regard to ethics. The interpreters knowledge, skills and experience will inform their decisions and choices.

Domains

civil

health

business

education

law

Setting

community

social

formal

prepare

Key questions

1. Whether you’re booked directly or through an interpreting agency, ask them for details.

2. Contact the clients concerned.

3. Contact D/deaf or non D/deaf consumers for background information and materials.

4. Read all relevant documents.

5. Ask for advice and guidance from interpreter colleagues who have experience of similar settings.

6. Research and find reference sources for relevant information.

7. Arrive early for the assignment and familiarise yourself with clients, consumers and co-workers.

Role

Anthony Mitchell

Etiquette;

Etiquette, the set of rules or customs that control accepted behaviour in particular social groups or social situations. Familiarise yourself with your surroundings, ask questions when you’re unsure.

Roles and boundaries;

Roles and boundaries are usual, typical, or standards which are particular to a given domain and setting. Familiarise yourself with the roles in a given assignment and understand the purpose of these roles.

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